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Some EpiPen Injectors Recalled, But Not In The U.S.

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Four batches of EpiPen auto-injectors have been recalled by the manufacturer over concerns that the devices may fail to work when needed. However, Mylan — the company behind the emergency allergy treatment — tells Consumerist that the potentially defective injectors were not distributed in the U.S.

Mylan’s Australian subsidiary AlphaPharm Pty. announced the recall yesterday, saying a manufacturing issue “may result in patients not receiving the required dose of adrenaline,” which can lead to the user’s symptoms getting worse, with potentially lethal results.

The company published this list of batch numbers and expiration dates for the four recalled batches:

This information can be found on the end of the carton containing EpiPen packs and printed on the label of each pen.

Mylan says it knows of two instances “world-wide” where the EpiPens from the recalled lot failed to activate. Since this implies that the recalled injectors were distributed internationally, we asked the company why it was not announcing the recall in the U.S.

“Mylan has issued a voluntary recall for one lot of EpiPen Auto-Injectors distributed in Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and Japan only,” said the company in an emailed response to Consumerist. “This lot was not distributed in the U.S.”

That said, it certainly can’t hurt to check your stash of EpiPens to make sure they aren’t somehow included in the recalled batches. We also have a number of readers outside of the U.S., so we’re posting this news as a service to any of them who may have some EpiPens waiting to (hopefully never) be used.

Pfizer’s Meridian Medicial subsidiary manufactured the EpiPens in the recalled lot. The company referred questions about the recall to Mylan.







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ryanbrazell
8 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Why Do So Many Men Get Vasectomies During March Madness?

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Maybe you’re watching the NCAA men’s basketball tournament on a small window on your work computer, or on your strategically placed smartphone at your desk. There’s also a higher than usual chance that you’re enjoying March Madness while recovering from your very recent vasectomy.

Data from the athenahealth network appears to confirm anecdotal claims that the NCAA tournament is a popular time to get this particular procedure.

Researchers analyzed data from 235,000 patient visits to 173 urology practices across the athenahealth network, focusing on men ages 20 to 49, and found that in the first round of the 2016 NCAA tournament, urologists performed 30% more vasectomies than they did during an average week.

The data also showed that in general, vasectomies are timed toward the end of the week, probably so people can spend the weekend at home and not have to miss work.

March Madness is no different, as urologists performed 41% more vasectomies on the Friday of the first week of the 2016 tournament than on a typical Friday.

We are far from surprised: On this very date five years ago, we heard about a urology practice in Cape Cod that offered a free pizza to patients who scheduled their vasectomies during March Madness.

The practice administrator said at the time that there’s no better time to loll around on the couch eating pizza and healing your sensitive bits than during March Madness.

“It does actually come with one topping. Maybe you can put some meatballs on it,” he joked.





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ryanbrazell
13 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Whole Food Recalls Cheeses Linked To Two Listeria-Related Deaths

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Whole Foods has expanded a recent recall of Vultro Creamery cheese products potentially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes after health officials linked two deaths and four illnesses to the cheese made from unpasteurized raw milk.

The recall, which came after Vultro Creamery expanded its own recall late last week, covers three cheese products sold in just eight stores in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York.

Monday’s expanded recall includes Vulto Creamery Andes, Hamden, and Walton Umber raw milk cheeses. The products were cut and packaged in clear plastic wrap with scale labels beginning with PLU codes 0200307, 0201357 or 0206308 and “sell by” dates from 01/02/2017 to 04/02/2017.

Previously, Whole Foods recalled two products — Vulto Creamery Ouleout and Miranda soft wash-rind raw milk cheeses — sold at nine stores in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, and New York.

Vultro Creamery’s listeria contamination came to light on March 7 when the company announced the recall of all lots of its Ouleout, Miranda, Heinennellie, and Willowemoc soft wash-rind raw milk cheeses.

The company said in a notice to the Food & Drug Administration, that FDA testing found Ouleout lot #617 positive for listeria monocytogenes and the New York Department of Agriculture and Markets found possible contaminations in Ouleout lot #623.

The soft raw milk cheeses were distributed nationwide, with most being sold at retail locations in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States, California, Chicago, Portland, OR, and Washington, D.C.

The company said at the time that it had suspended production of the cheese while the FDA and the company investigate the problem.

Two days later, the Centers for Disease Controls and Prevention announced that it was collaborating with public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the FDA to investigate a multi-state outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes.

According to the CDC, six people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria have been reported in Connecticut, Florida, New York, and Vermont since Sept. 1, 2016.

All six of the ill people reported being hospitalized, and two people from Connecticut and Vermont died.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that soft raw milk cheese made by Vulto Creamery of Walton, NY, is the likely source of this outbreak, according to the CDC, adding that all six people who became ill reported eating soft cheese.

Additionally, the Connecticut Department of Public Health collected leftover cheeses from the deceased person’s home in Connecticut.

The agency identified the outbreak strain of Listeria in leftover Ouleout cheese from Vulto Creamery.

Following the CDC’s announcement, Vultro Creamery expanded its recall to cover four additional cheeses: Heinennellie, Miranda, Willowemoc, Ouleout, Andes, Blue Blais, Hamden, and Walton Umber.

In all, Whole Foods is recalling the following products:

Cheese Sold At: PLU Code Sold By Date Range
Andes 94 Derby Street, Hingham, MA
1255 Raritan Road Unit 150, Clark, NJ
300 Bergen Town Center, Paramus, NJ
238 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY
1095 Avenue of the Americas. New York, NY
270 Greenwich Street, New York, NY
4 Union Square South, New York, NY
575 Boston Post Road, Port Chester, NY
0200307
0201357
0206308
01/02/2017 to 04/02/2017.
Hamden 94 Derby Street, Hingham, MA
1255 Raritan Road Unit 150, Clark, NJ
300 Bergen Town Center, Paramus, NJ
238 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY
1095 Avenue of the Americas. New York, NY
270 Greenwich Street, New York, NY
4 Union Square South, New York, NY
575 Boston Post Road, Port Chester, NY
0200307
0201357
0206308
01/02/2017 to 04/02/2017
Walton Umber 94 Derby Street, Hingham, MA
1255 Raritan Road Unit 150, Clark, NJ
300 Bergen Town Center, Paramus, NJ
238 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY
1095 Avenue of the Americas. New York, NY
270 Greenwich Street, New York, NY
4 Union Square South, New York, NY
575 Boston Post Road, Port Chester, NY
0200307
0201357
0206308
 01/02/2017 to 04/02/2017
Ouleout 350 Grasmere Avenue, Fairfield, CT
115 Prospect Street, Cambridge, MA
0200305
0200306
12/27/2016 to 03/28/2017
Miranda 170 Great Road, Bedford, MA
575 Worcester Road, Framingham, MA
647 Washington Street, Newton, MA
2 Somerset Street, Portland, ME
1425 Central Avenue, Albany, NY
250 7th Ave, New York, NY
270 Greenwich Street, New York, NY
0200305
0200306
12/27/2016 to 03/28/2017

 





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ryanbrazell
15 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Soynut Butter Co. Expands Recall To All Products, Including Granola

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Earlier this week, we shared the news that I.M. Healthy soy butter, a product that’s handy for making PBJs for kids who attend peanut-free schools and daycares, has been linked to E. coli infections, mostly in children. Now the company has recalled all of its products, not just certain batches, and now including its granola as well.

In the latest update, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shares that 16 illnesses have been linked to the nut butter, with 14 of those being children under age 18.

Eight of the patients have ended up in the hospital, and five have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a possible E. coli complication that can lead to kidney failure and death.

Symptoms of E. coli infection include stomach cramps, vomiting, diarrhea that can be bloody, and a low-grade fever.

The recall includes jars, tubs, single-serve cups, and now also 45-pound pails of the soy butter, and is not limited only to specific “best by” dates.

The company’s granola is also now included in the recall, which comes in single-serve packages, as well as packages of 12 ounces, 50 ounces, and 25-pound bulk packages. It comes in the flavors Original, Apple, Blueberry, and Raisin and Cranberry.







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ryanbrazell
21 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Soy Nut Butter Recalled For Possible E. Coli Contamination

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Soy nut butter is an alternative to peanut butter for people who have allergies, or for schools and child care facilities that have been declared peanut-free zones due to students’ allergies. However, a product meant to keep people safe is endangering their lives in a different way, after 12 people, mostly children, became infected with E. coli from the nut butter.

Specifically, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that 11 out of the 12 infected people are under 18 years old. Half of them have been hospitalized, and four of them have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a potentially fatal form of kidney failure. HUS is a complication of E. coli infection that’s most common in children, the elderly, and people with compromised immune systems. Fortunately, none of the patients to date have died.

What should you look for? The potentially contaminated product is I.M. Healthy brand creamy SoyNut Butter. Consumers are most likely to have the jars at home, and the 4-pound foodservice package is sold to schools and child care facilities. The company also sells single-serve cups of the butter.

ucm544977Here are the Best By dates that you should look for:

Jars: July 5, 2018, Aug. 30, 2018, and Aug. 31, 2018

Tubs: Nov. 16, 2018 and July 25, 2018

Single-Serve Cups: August 8, 2018

If you have the butter in your home, you should bring it back to the store for a refund. If you decide to throw it out on your own instead, make sure that the jar is sealed and thrown away in a sealed bag to keep trash-scavenging animals from eating the product.

The CDC specifically warns consumers not to just go ahead and eat products if they’ve already made a few sandwiches and no one in the household has become sick yet.

The symptoms of E. coli infection include stomach cramps, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), and vomiting. You can get sick between one and 10 days after eating contaminated food,

If you have any questions about the product or about this recall, contact the company at 800-288-1012.







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ryanbrazell
23 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Troubleshooting Tortillas

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Photos and story by Kerri Conan

A few weeks ago I had fun making tortillas with Mark. Inspired—and armed with a bag of local coarse-ground masa harina from Sacred Sun Cooperative Farm in Kansas—I immediately invested in a tortilla press. And then boom, right on cue Sarah Curry asked question on Instagram about avoiding lard in tortillas. (Add your own questions and see more responses with #askbitt.)

This month I’ve now concocted tortillas three ways: with lard, with no fat, and with a good-quality liquid sunflower oil. And I’m happy to report all work fine, though the ones without fat were less pliable, more crumbly, less chewy. So the answer is yes: You can replace the lard with another fat—or nothing at all.

Mark’s got a detailed recipe in How to Bake Everything with a masa-water-fat ratio of 12:8:1. Since the upside of fat far outweighs its minimal caloric contribution, I say go for it. Lard leaves behind a luxurious flavor and subtle taste. But oil is fine, too, especially when you’re working with an excellent tasting ground corn; that will dominate.

About masa harina: There are good brands in supermarkets now, the kind that is ground relatively finely so all you need to do is add water and fat to form the dough (which is also called “masa”). Masa harina is different from cornmeal or corn flour in that it’s ground from kernels that have been soaked in a lime solution. The process makes the nutrients in corn easier for the body to absorb and gives tortillas that distinctive flavor. (The freshest tortillas and tamales start with the wet, soaked corn, known as nixtamal; but that’s another story.) You can make tortillas with a coarse grind of masa but if you’ve got a clean coffee mill or a strong blender or food processor I suggest you take it down a notch for a more elegant, less fragile result.

The dough isn’t too bad to roll by hand, though a press makes the job much easier and I bet you’ll make tortillas more often if you have one. Heavy cast iron minimizes the work further. Use parchment (or plastic) on top and bottom to ensure smooth removal. Then cook them on a hot, dry cast iron or steel griddle or skillet or over an open flame; just a minute or two per side. Wrapped in a towel they’ll stay warm while you get dinner on the table, or reheat them in the microwave—again wrapped in a towel or in a special vessel for the purpose. (And yes, you can also make flour tortillas the same way.) You may never buy tortillas again!

The post Troubleshooting Tortillas appeared first on Mark Bittman.

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ryanbrazell
27 days ago
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Richmond, VA
sfernseb
27 days ago
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Washington DC
ryanbrazell
27 days ago
I really do not have room in my kitchen for a tortilla press, but dang if I don't want one right now ....
sfernseb
20 days ago
They're also helpful for making dumpling wrappers for potstickers...
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