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See who cares.

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The post See who cares. appeared first on Indexed.

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ryanbrazell
11 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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duerig
11 days ago
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Everybody can opt out of politics. Even those who are affected negatively by the outcomes. It is often the least privileged who are the least political.

Please do not try to shame people into activism. It works about as well as shaming them into being math whizzes.

You Can Live Your Best Hermit Life In The Grey Gardens House For Just $20M

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Kick the cats out of bed and dust off your best Little Edie dance moves, folks! The Grey Gardens house — home to famously reclusive mother-daughter Beale duo — is on the market for the bargain price of just under $20 million. That could buy a lot of cat/raccoon food.

The 120-year-old, seven-bedroom, six-and-half-bathroom house in East Hampton, NY, comes with a tennis court and a pool, as well as a starring credit in the eponymous 1975 documentary by brothers Albert and David Maysles.

Grey Gardens looked into the lives of the women who lived there in abject squalor for many years: Edith Bouvier Beale was an aunt to Jacqueline Kennedy, while her daughter Edith was her first cousin. Their eccentric lifestyle was also portrayed in the 2009 HBO movie of the same name starring Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange.

(And by “eccentric,” of course we mean, “being okay with cats urinating on your portrait” and “feeding the raccoons that live in your attic.”)

Grey Gardens also happens to be the inspiration for Sandy Passages, our favorite episode of Documentary Now:

Seller and journalist Sally Quinn said she and her husband, longtime Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, purchased the home for roughly $220,000 in 1979, reports The Wall Street Journal, two years after Big Edie passed away.

The house is currently listed by Corcoran for $19.95 million, which means the Consumerist team has some work to do if we want to scrape together enough money for that staff summer home we’ve been wanting.

(h/t Rolling Stone)





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ryanbrazell
11 days ago
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I've got $20 if somebody else wants to kick in the other $19,999,980.
Richmond, VA
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ryanbrazell
16 days ago
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L O L

This was actually my same train of thought this morning, when I slept until 11am.
Richmond, VA
popular
15 days ago
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kemayo
15 days ago
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Alternately... I have a kid. But she's fairly self reliant, and can handle herself if I sleep in.
St Louis, MO
adamcole
15 days ago
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Who wants my fucking kids
Philadelphia, PA, USA
kleer001
16 days ago
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True... But then again this attitude is an evolutionary dead end.

Duress Codes for Fingerprint Access Control

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Mike Specter has an interesting idea on how to make biometric access-control systems more secure: add a duress code. For example, you might configure your iPhone so that either thumb or forefinger unlocks the device, but your left middle finger disables the fingerprint mechanism (useful in the US where being compelled to divulge your password is a 5th Amendment violation but being forced to place your finger on the fingerprint reader is not) and the right middle finger permanently wipes the phone (useful in other countries where coercion techniques are much more severe).

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ryanbrazell
25 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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rtreborb
23 days ago
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Smart
zippy72
24 days ago
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Excellent idea. An "automatically call law enforcement" one might be a bit too far though...
FourSquare, qv
StunGod
24 days ago
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A very good idea. Also, don't give your phone all of your fingers. It's much easier to scrape one or two than all of them, especially under duress.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
chrisrosa
25 days ago
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definitely need this...a duress option for biometric access systems.
San Francisco, CA
toddgrotenhuis
25 days ago
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YES. I've been arguing that more things need duress codes.
Indianapolis

Keep. Your. Eyes. On. Mike. Pence.

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[Content Note: War on agency.]

As I mentioned earlier, one of Donald Trump's first executive orders was to reinstate the Global Gag Rule, also known as the "Mexico City Policy," which "bans recipients of U.S. foreign aid from offering abortion-related services."
Made U.S. policy through an executive order issued by President Ronald Reagan, it restricts family planning providers from offering comprehensive health care and, when in place, denies international family planning organizations the right to:

* Provide abortion-related information to their patients and clients
* Provide referrals to other health care providers who perform safe abortions
* Provide legal abortions or legal abortion-related services
* Advocate for the legalization of abortion in their country

The Mexico City Policy infringes upon women's fundamental right to make informed decisions about their bodies and their health. It denies women access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care that includes abortion care and related information and referrals.
It is a vile policy, rescinded by Democratic presidents and reinstated by Republican presidents like clockwork.

Trump's position on abortion has been inconsistent, to put it politely, but he has made it abundantly clear that, as a Republican president, he will align himself with anti-choice extremists. Including and especially Vice-President Mike Pence, to whom Trump delegated his presidential transition and who has been tasked with taking the lead on policy.


To be clear: I am not suggesting that Trump is stupid. I am observing, based on Trump's own comments, that he doesn't care about policy; that he is willfully ignorant about an enormous amount of policy because to be well-versed in it serves no purpose to him, as it does not cater to his grandiose ego and would steal time from the things that do.

Trump explicitly wanted a vice-president who "would be in charge of domestic and foreign policy," leaving Trump free to "Make America great again," whatever that means on any given day. Tweeting at SNL on one day; provoking China by calling the Taiwanese President on another.

Everything else belongs to Mike Pence, who was a radically conservative governor and has already made several notable trips to Capitol Hill to meet with Congressional Republicans to see what radically conservative legislation—starting with the repeal of the Affordable Care Act—they can bring to Trump's desk for his disinterested signature.

In December, Gallup noted Pence's influence squarely sits on the shoulders of Trump's lack of experience: "As has been true for previous vice presidents, Pence's background complements that of the president. But this seems particularly important for the incoming administration, given that Trump will be one of the few presidents without any elected political experience (the last was Dwight Eisenhower in 1952). Pence's legislative and policy experience may make him the 'quarterback' on the White House legislative team who has to deal with complex congressional processes. And his experience as a state governor may make him someone Trump relies on to help navigate 10th Amendment issues."

Trump's comprehensive inexperience leaves a void that Pence will be happy to fill.

Trump has almost certainly not learned the details of the Global Gag Rule, nor will he, but he didn't need to know them. Pence knew them. He is an extreme anti-choicer who, as Indiana's governor, waged war on Planned Parenthood, defunded clinics, and criminalized miscarriages. You bet he knew the details of the Global Gag Rule. You bet it was one of Mike Pence's priorities.

This, then, is a perfect and terrible example of why I am the brokenest of broken records about keeping our eyes on our most powerful vice-president ever, including even Dick Cheney.

As I wrote previously:
During the campaign, I repeatedly warned about Mike Pence's extremism with a particular urgency, given Donald Trump's desire for a vice-president who "would be in charge of domestic and foreign policy."

And, since the election, I have been carefully watching the role Pence is playing in the emerging Trump administration. He was put in charge of the presidential transition, and, to those who have long been familiar with Pence, his fingerprints are all over the selection of people and policy that is emerging.

…An article in Politico confirms precisely that about which I have been warning. Under the blunt title "Pence's power play," the writers detail his efficacy in building bridges with the Republican Congressional caucus and quote a former Pence aide saying, "He's going to play a more influential role on the policy front than we've seen from vice presidents in recent years."

It is a neat bit of understatement about an already observable fact.

Pence's style has always been less aggressive than it is opportunist — which does not make him any less dangerous. To the contrary, his patience in waiting for effective opportunities in which to implement his extremism, and his willingness to brazenly disregard democratic processes to get it done, makes him all the more toxic.

His stealth is the perfect complement to Trump's theatrical egotism: Pence will exploit every second of being ignored to enact a radical conservative agenda in the long shadow cast by Trump’s attention-grubbing megalomania.

Mike Pence would like nothing more than our inattention. Which is precisely why we must keep our eyes on him.
Pence—who, unlike his boss, does not have an ego rooted in personal glory, but in personal orchestration of a conservative agenda, irrespective of whether he gets the credit—is smart enough to realize that he has more power without scrutiny.

As a vice-president (and thus president of the Senate) who has been handed extraordinary power by the president, and a former member of the House with deep ties to many members of the GOP caucus, Pence is perfectly positioned to simultaneously: Assist Trump with his awful executive agenda; support Congress in their sinister legislative aims; and work with the Cabinet (which he has clearly shaped) to destroy every federal agency.

Trust that Pence does not want any attention that stands to undercut his enormous power at the center of this triangle.

Which is why I will say once more: Pence would like nothing more than our inattention—and that is precisely why we must keep our eyes on him.
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ryanbrazell
28 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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Our Choices

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trump-choices1500If you like these cartoons, please support them at my Patreon.

Transcript of cartoon:

(The title of the comic strip, “Our Choices,” is printed in large letters at the top of the cartoon.)

Panel 1

(A woman and a man talk, the woman holding her hands out, palms up, in a “let’s be reasonable here” gesture.)

CAPTION: Option One

WOMAN: We should give President Trump a chance! It’s too soon to panic.

MAN: Exactly!

Panel 2

(The background is filled with huge fires. Two armed soldiers, both wearing armbands and hats marked “T,” stand in the background looking stern. In the foreground, the man and the woman hurry along, bent downward, looking fearfully towards the ground.)

CAPTION: 8 Years Later

MAN: Why didn’t you resist when you could?

Panel 3

CAPTION: Option Two

(We see dozens or hundreds of angry demonstrators, yelling and waving fists in the air and holding up protest signs that say “RESIST!”. One of the protesters is the woman from the previous two panels.)

Panel 4

(The woman and man from the first panel. The woman looks annoyed, the man is making fun of her, his arms spread wide..)

CAPTION: 4 Years Later

MAN: So Trump didn’t destroy the country… Don’t you feel silly now!

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ryanbrazell
28 days ago
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Richmond, VA
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tante
29 days ago
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Choices
Oldenburg/Germany
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